Month: July 2018

The mantle beneath Tibet has been torn into four massive pieces, according to a new computer model that gives an unprecedented glimpse at what’s going on under the surface our planet. Determining exactly what’s happening so far underground isn’t always easy, but can help in everything from predicting earthquakes to understanding how terrain evolves over
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Theoretical research by an international team of physicists has discovered that the Great Pyramid of Giza can concentrate electromagnetic energy in its internal chambers and under its base. And although the ancient Egyptian’s probably weren’t aware of this weird design quirk, the study could be important for nanoparticle research in the future. “Applications of modern
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The world’s largest king penguin colony has dramatically collapsed, and as yet scientists just don’t know why. From 2 million members in the 1980s, including 500,000 breeding pairs, the population on the sub-Antarctic Île aux Cochons has shrunk to just 60,000 breeding pairs. Using recent high-resolution satellite data from 2005 onwards, and helicopter and satellite
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“The probability that ‘In My Life’ was written by McCartney is .018.” “Which basically means it’s pretty convincingly a Lennon song.” And with that, Harvard researcher and passionate Beatles fan Mark Glickman made his telling contribution to one of the eternal pop music pub arguments – who wrote the Beatles’ best tracks? The difference this
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The headlines in recent months read like an international eco-thriller. At Mauna Loa Observatory, perched high on a Hawaiian volcano, researchers measure unusual levels of CFC-11 in the atmosphere. The measurements baffle the scientific community: CFC-11, a potent ozone-depleting gas, has been carefully monitored since it was banned under the 1987 Montreal Protocol. But the
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16 different species of Phaeodaria (http://caliban.mpiz-koeln.mpg.de/haeckel/kunstformen/high/Tafel_061_schema_300.html).Public Domain / Kunstformen der Natur, Ernst Haeckel (1904) Little light permeates 100 meters below sea level where the ocean’s twilight zone begins. Although this section of the ocean is relatively food-depleted, the twilight zone is teeming with sea life that subsists on gradually sinking bits of organic matter, including waste products and decomposing critters. This “marine
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The Carr Fire tearing through Northern California is so powerful that it’s creating its own weather patterns. The explosive blaze reached the city of Redding on Thursday night. By Saturday morning, the fire grew to 80,906 acres and is only around 5 percent contained, according to officials. The fire has destroyed 500 structures, and officials say 5,000 more are threatened. Around
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Cover and author photo for THROUGH TWO DOORS AT ONCE by Anil AnanthaswamyPublicity images from Dutton, composite by Chad Orzel I got an advance copy of Anil Ananthaswamy’s forthcoming Through Two Doors at Once a while back, and while I was too busy with my own book to read it in time to blurb it,
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Use a little imagination, and you see the new rover’s “face.”Credit: NASA / JPL-Caltech Now under construction—NASA’s newest rover. Still without a name, the souped-up successor to Curiosity won’t launch for two years. But already, engineers are “bolting together the bits and pieces of hardware,” says Ken Farley of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena,
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The epithelium is tissue formed of cells organized in layers. It serves covering, secretory and protective functions. Pictured here is a typical depiction of epithelial cells. But are they really shaped this way?  (Photo by: QAI Publishing/UIG via Getty Images) The scutoid of trust. A scutoid peg in a round hole. Bizarre love scutoid. The
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Caribbean lizards that survived the tough 2017 hurricane season have larger toe pads, on both front and back limbs, report researchers. The work is first to demonstrate the effects of hurricane-induced natural selection. The hyperactive 2017 season was one of the worst that the Atlantic Ocean region ever experienced. Hurricane Harvey hit in mid-August 2017,
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The Chinese shipbuilder that’s constructing Beijing’s third aircraft carrier, Type 002, leaked an artist’s impression of that carrier on social media in late June that heightened intrigue about China’s naval ambitions before quickly taking it down. The China Shipbuilding Industry Corporation photo showed the future Type 002 with a large flight deck that featured an
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Dark triad personality (DTP) traits are narcissism, Machiavellianism, and psychopathy. These traits manifest in people as excessive self-love, a manipulative attitude, and a lack of empathy. It’s unclear how many people in the population have these traits, but various studies and estimates put the number somewhere between 1 percent and 10 percent. DTPs are often
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Do North American landbirds molt on their breeding territories before migrating or do they have discrete locations where they go to molt? The answer is surprising a lot of people This adult male northern cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis) has a less-than-spectacular appearance because he is molting. This study suggests that northern cardinals, which are resident, still
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Shark Week, the Discovery Channel’s annual bonanza of shark documentaries, is celebrating its 30th anniversary this week. It’s the longest-running series on cable, and that longevity has given it a prime role in pop culture and public understanding of shark science. But its legacy is a mixed bag. As a shark conservation biologist, I both
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Shutterstock Accidentally biting your gum is painful, but the upside is that it will usually heal quite quickly; much faster, in fact, than a wound of similar size on your skin. That’s quite odd, when you think about it. After all, between eating, talking, yawning and making all manner of facial expressions, our mouths are
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