Month: August 2019

Who doesn’t love a juicy burger? About 5,000 Americans. And not from dietary preference, but because a single bite bite could cause hives, shortness of breath, or even death. Check out how this uninvited wilderness hitchhikers could put you off steaks for quite some time. Science Insider tells you all you need to know about
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This visualization tracks the trajectory of the Voyager 1 spacecraft through the solar system. Launched on September 5, 1977, it was one of two spacecraft sent to visit the giant planets of the outer solar system. Voyager 1 flew by Jupiter and Saturn before being directed out of the solar system. To fit the 40
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Echidna’s are one of Australia’s cutest and weirdest animals. The spiky creatures lay eggs even though they’re mammals, they eat termites but they’re not related to anteaters, and they evolved from an ancestor shared with the duck-billed platypus. And now we’ve learned they also have one of the most impressive bushfire strategies we’ve ever heard
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WASHINGTON — Radio astronomers say OneWeb has not, until recently, paid attention to their concerns about interference, but that it is not too late to avoid a spectrum conflict.  OneWeb has resumed conversations about potential interference from its planned megaconstellation after talks stalled out three years ago, according to the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO), which
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Come summertime, fruit flies arrive in droves. They’re drawn in by the smell of fruit — and by the fungi and other microorganisms that produce rot. Once they land on apples, bananas, and whatever else they can find, they lay hundreds of eggs that hatch into hundreds of maggots, which then pupate into flies. So
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WASHINGTON — A rare uncrewed flight of a Soyuz spacecraft took another twist Aug. 24 when the spacecraft failed to make an automated docking with the International Space Station. The Soyuz MS-14 spacecraft was scheduled to dock with the station’s Poisk module at about 1:30 a.m. Eastern. While the spacecraft’s initial approach to the station
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#Outrageous_Acts This sculpture unrolls into a super strong bridge. Find out how it transforms and what makes it so strong. Full Episodes Streaming FREE: https://www.sciencechannel.com/tv-shows/outrageous-acts-of-science/ Subscribe to Science Channel: http://bit.ly/SubscribeScience Check out SCI2 for infinitely awesome science videos. Every day. http://bit.ly/SCI2YT Join Us on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/ScienceChannel Follow Us on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/sciencechannel
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WASHINGTON — Swedish company Ovzon left a contract with SpaceX for a Falcon Heavy launch in favor of an Ariane 5 mission from European launch provider Arianespace.  In an earnings report Aug. 23, Ovzon said it had “recently contracted Arianespace to launch our satellite in 2021.”  “[W]e have thus left the preliminary agreements we had,”
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Photographs snapped by a shoebox-sized probe that explored the near-Earth asteroid Ryugu have offered new clues about its composition, insights that will help scientists understand the formation of our solar system. The German-French Mobile Asteroid Surface Scout (MASCOT) hitched a ride on Japan’s Hayabusa2 spaceship, touching down on the 900-meter (3,000 feet) wide asteroid, whose
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Every time you visit a web page or send an email, data is being sent and received through an intricate cable system that stretches around the globe. Since the 1850s, we’ve been laying cables across oceans to become better connected. Today, there are hundreds of thousands of miles of fiber optic cables constantly transmitting data
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On July 20, 1969, humans walked on another world for the first time in history, achieving the goal that President John F. Kennedy had set in 1961, before Americans had even orbited the Earth. After a landing that included dodging a lunar crater and boulder field just before touchdown, Apollo 11 astronauts Neil Armstrong and
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This article originally appeared in the August 19, 2019 issue of SpaceNews magazine. When small launch vehicle developer Vector announced it was suspending operations Aug. 9, many in the industry wondered if this was the beginning of a long-anticipated shakeout of an overcrowded market. Instead, the problems may be specific to the company. “In response
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The discovery of several Earth-like planets outside the solar system has opened the possibilities of expanding our horizons and establish out first interstellar colonies. What would life be like on these ‘super-Earths’? And if we ever got there… would we be able to leave? Science Insider tells you all you need to know about science:
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Scientists have found evidence of superconductivity happening at temperatures and energy levels way above its normal boundaries – a finding which could one day go on to help revolutionise the design and workings of our electronics. A superconductor material is one that can transfer electricity without resistance. In turn, this means the electricity travels through
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Rocks on the surface of Ryugu, the distant asteroid currently being explored by the Japanese space probe Hayabusa-2, bear a striking resemblance to rocks from meteorites that have crashed down on Earth. That’s according to a team of European and Japanese scientists who analyzed newly-released photos that Hayabusa-2’s robotic lander, MASCOT, took from the asteroid’s
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WASHINGTON — Shareholders of satellite operator AsiaSat have voted overwhelmingly in favor of privatization, setting the company on a course to delist from the Hong Kong stock exchange on Sept. 5. AsiaSat said Aug. 23 that shareholders controlling 99.8% of shares not already held by its majority owners, CITIC and Carlyle, voted in favor of
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If you doubled in size, your weight would be eight times greater. That’s the trouble with growing tall. Gravity’s pull is keeping us all down. But there are a few earthly giants that have fought gravity and won.  Science Insider tells you all you need to know about science: space, medicine, biotech, physiology, and more.
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NASA astronaut Randy Bresnik captured this footage with a GoPro camera on Oct. 20, 2017 during a spacewalk outside the International Space Station. Bresnik reflected on this quiet moment, “Sometimes on a #spacewalk, you just have to take a moment to enjoy the beauty of our planet Earth. This Go-Pro footage is from our spacewalk
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This op-ed originally appeared in the August 19, 2019 issue of SpaceNews magazine. During Apollo’s heyday, large organizations like NASA ran on programmatic, linear planning models. MBAs were taught to develop business plans and boards held management accountable to the predefined objectives and milestones within them. “Deviation from plan” was equated with failure. Five decades
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Patterns of neoprene fabric fit together like a jigsaw puzzle in order to create a heavily insulated wet suit. Watch full episodes: http://www.hulu.com/how-its-made http://bit.ly/HowItsMadeFullEpisodes Subscribe to Science Channel: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=sciencechannel Check out SCI2 for infinitely awesome science videos. Every day. http://bit.ly/SCI2YT Download the TestTube app: http://testu.be/1ndmmMq
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Pretzels have long been considered good-luck symbols. More than $550 million worth of pretzels are sold in the United States annually. #HowItsMade Mondays 9/8c on Science http://www.sciencechannel.com/tv-shows/how-its-made/ Subscribe to Science Channel: http://bit.ly/SubscribeScience Check out SCI2 for infinitely awesome science videos. Every day. http://bit.ly/SCI2YT Download the TestTube app: http://testu.be/1ndmmMq
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A still image, taken from a video footage and released by Russian space agency Roscosmos, shows robot Skybot F-850, also known as FEDOR, inside the Russian Soyuz MS-14 spacecraft carried by Soyuz-2.1a booster after the launch from the Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan August 22, 2019. Russian space agency Roscosmos/Handout via REUTERS MOSCOW (Reuters) – A Russian
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WASHINGTON — United Launch Alliance completed the last launch of a Delta 4 Medium Aug. 22, sending a GPS-3 satellite into a medium Earth orbit for the U.S. Air Force.  The Delta 4 Medium rocket lifted off at 9:06 a.m. from Space Launch Complex-37 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. The GPS-3 satellite,
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Drugs like marijuana, cocaine, and MDMA can remain in your system for days, weeks, and even months. But they vary drastically in how long they can be detected in your urine, blood, and hair. Science Insider tells you all you need to know about science: space, medicine, biotech, physiology, and more. Subscribe to our channel
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