Nature

Gas expelled by revellers’ bodies accounts for about one-quarter of the methane emitted by the Munich Oktoberfest. Credit: Christof Stache/AFP/Getty Environmental sciences 02 April 2020 Scientists cycled around the annual festival of beer and wurst to estimate its methane output. Every year, the famous beer-soaked, sausage-laden Oktoberfest in Munich, Germany, produces large amounts of natural
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Clinical research into treatments for COVID-19 is being boosted by multidisciplinary input, but it is crucial that the fruits of these labours are freely shared so that the world can benefit.Credit: Axel Heimken/AFP/Getty Although the coronavirus pandemic has become a threat to every country on Earth, world leaders are all at sea — showing few
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Silent Spring author Rachel Carson helped inspire the global green movement.Credit: Alfred Eisenstaedt/The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Last week, academic and performance artist Colleen Webster was looking forward to doing her one-woman show on the life of the biologist, science writer and environmental pioneer Rachel Carson. “She was shy. She was humble. Devoted to family. Committed
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Residents of Brussels have been told to stay at home, leaving the city’s streets empty.Credit: Jonathan Raa/NurPhoto via Getty The coronavirus pandemic has brought chaos to lives and economies around the world. But efforts to curb the spread of the virus might mean that the planet itself is moving a little less. Researchers who study
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The elongated bristlemouth (Sigmops elongatus) is abundant in the oceans’ twilight zone.Credit: Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution/Paul Caiger The twilight zone contains the largest and least exploited fish stocks of the world’s oceans. Spanning from just below 200 metres to 1,000 metres deep, it is an interface between the well-studied marine life in the sunlit zone
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London City Airport closed on 25 March owing to travel restrictions prompted by the coronavirus pandemic.Credit: Simon Dawson/Bloomberg/Getty When the US Congress passed a US$2-trillion economic-stimulus plan on 27 March, $25 billion in economic aid for passenger airlines was just a small piece of it. But for environmentalists and their allies in Washington DC, it
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You are about to take the stage to speak in front of a large audience. As you wait, your heart starts to pound, your breathing quickens, your blood pressure rises and your palms sweat. These physiological responses are evolutionarily conserved mechanisms to prepare your body to fight against imminent dangers, or to run away quickly.
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A 3D magnetic resonance imaging scan of the brain.Credit: Tom Barrick, Chris Clark, SGHMS/SPL The Idea of the Brain: A History Matthew Cobb Profile (2020) The poet Emily Dickinson rendered the brain wider than the sky, deeper than the sea, and about the weight of God. Scientists facing the daunting task of describing this organ
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In the advent of a new global pandemic, COVID-19, roboticist and founding editor of Science Robotics, Guang-Zhong Yang, has expressed how robots could help in combating the spread of infectious diseases after being serviced by a robot during his 14-day self-quarantine. In an editorial featured in Science Robotics, lead experts in robotics agree that the outbreak of the
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There is a new development on the theory that suggests that pangolins are the missing link between bats and humans in spreading coronavirus–the pangolins are not the culprit.  Scientists analyzed the viruses of pangolins (Manis javanica) captured in anti-smuggling activities in southern China. The study revealed that the identified coronaviruses in pangolins are different from
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The University of Rochester in New York saw protests in 2017 over the Florian Jaeger case.Credit: Rachel Jerome Ferraro/NYT/Redux/eyevine The University of Rochester in New York has agreed to pay a US$9.4-million settlement to researchers who sued the institution over how it handled allegations of sexual harassment against a cognitive science professor. The settlement, announced
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A study on the Denman Glacier in East Antarctica has assessed the changes it has undergone during the last 22 years. This has been published in the Geophysical Research Letters, a journal of the American Geophysical Union. The proponents of the study were from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) of NASA as well as scientists
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Benjamin Thompson, Noah Baker, and Amy Maxmen discuss efforts to develop treatments for COVID-19. Download MP3 In this episode: 02:00 A push for plasma In New York, hospitals are preparing to infuse patients with the antibody-rich blood plasma of people who have recovered from COVID-19. This approach has been used during disease outbreaks for over
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Stanford University researchers have developed a new device that enables them to observe real-time neural activity in the brain.  The researchers published their work on the device in Science Advances. Lead author and materials science & engineering graduate student Abdulmalik Obaid revealed how they designed new processes to create 3D silicon electronics that scales up easily. The device
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The Lincoln Park campus of DePaul University in Chicago, Illinois, is empty after being closed to faculty members over COVID-19 concerns. In this unprecedented time, many scientists must keep their research going from home — a steep challenge, but not an unmanageable one.Credit: Max Herman/NurPhoto/Getty As universities close down, heads of life-science laboratories are having
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Hello Nature readers, would you like to get this Briefing in your inbox free every day? Sign up here Clinical research has been disrupted as hospitals devote more resources to caring for people critically ill with COVID-19.Credit: Alberto Pizzoli/AFP/Getty Scientists are rushing to launch clinical trials of experimental vaccines and treatments for the coronavirus —
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Protein attachment to the membrane of a starfish egg cell occurs in rippling waves (video is roughly 100 times faster than actual speed). Credit: Fakhri Lab/MIT Physics 26 March 2020 Waves that travel through an egg’s outer membrane echo those seen in physical systems at much smaller — and much larger — scales. Some cellular
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A closer look at the casualties caused by a novel type of coronavirus reveals that COVID-19 patients with cardiovascular or heart conditions appear to be especially vulnerable, according to Nature Review.  During the months succeeding the outbreak in the city of Wuhan in Hubei, China in December 2019, the Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention has published the
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Passengers quarantined on the cruise ship Diamond Princess.Credit: Eugene Hoshiko/AP/Shutterstock When COVID-19 was detected among passengers on the cruise ship Diamond Princess, the vessel offered a rare opportunity to understand features of the new coronavirus that are hard to investigate in the wider population. Some of the first studies from the ship — where some
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Superbugs, or drug-resistant microbes, have become a significant health problem. Drug-resistant bacterial pathogens kill at least 700,000 people each year due to drug-resistant infections, which includes 230,000 deaths due to multi-drug-resistant TB or tuberculosis. It is projected that if action is not taken against it, the death toll could reach 10 million annually by 2050.
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The calls to shift to a plant-based diet to help mitigate climate change are getting louder. Farmer Daniel Slabbert and their supporters, however, look at it differently. They believe cows and cropland to help save the planet. In South Africa, there are still plenty of grasslands or veld. Farmers such as Slabbert are practicing regenerative agriculture,
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Health-care professionals are working to exhaustion so that the sick get immediate relief. Researchers are working continuous shifts too.Credit: Paolo Miranda/AFP/Getty Like many of you, we’re struggling to comprehend the new world we find ourselves in. For decades, we’ve been publishing research and news about emerging infectious diseases and the potential havoc a pandemic can
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Credit: Getty Giving a talk can open doors to new collaborations, increase your chances of funding success and make it more likely that other people will respond to your ideas. But scientific presentations are too often confusing, boring and overstuffed. Here are some suggestions, based on our experience as speakers, audience members and presentation trainers,
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1. Treutlein, P., Genes, C., Hammerer, K., Poggio, M. & Rabl, P. In Cavity Optomechanics: Nano- and Micromechanical Resonators Interacting with Light (eds Aspelmeyer, M., Kippenberg, T. J. & Marquardt, F.) 327–351 (Springer, 2014). 2. Rabl, P. et al. Strong magnetic coupling between an electronic spin qubit and a mechanical resonator. Phys. Rev. B 79,
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(Photo : Pixabay)Dog owners were in a panic last week from two reported cases of pet dogs being tested positive for COVID-19 in China and Hongkong. Public health and animal experts maintain there is little evidence that dogs get COVID-19. There is also no evidence indicating that these pets transmit COVID-19 to humans or animals.
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Hello Nature readers, would you like to get this Briefing in your inbox free every day? Sign up here Artist’s reconstruction of the world’s oldest known modern bird, Asteriornis maastrichtensis, in its original environment.Phillip Krzeminski An extraordinary fossil skull belonged to the oldest modern bird ever found. The duck-sized Asteriornis maastrichtensis lived 66.7 million years
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In the ancient ice sheets near Earth’s poles, tiny bubbles trapped in the compacted layers of snowfall provide a natural archive of air from ages past, but one that is not straightforward to read. Forty years ago, the glaciologist Robert Delmas and colleagues developed a technique for reliably measuring the amount of carbon dioxide in
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Understanding what causes colorectal cancer (CRC) could help to combat this disease of the colon. Writing in Nature, Pleguezuelos-Manzano et al.1 report evidence that strengthens a previously suspected connection to a type of gut bacterium. The authors implicate this microbe by pinpointing bacterial ‘fingerprints’ in DNA alterations found in CRC cells. Certain bacteria produce genotoxic
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