Nature

Japan is considering new rules to prevent the leak of sensitive technology, such as sensors.Credit: Tomohiro Ohsumi/Getty Japan considers new rules on research interference amid US–China tensions The Japanese government is considering tougher rules to address the risk of foreign interference in scientific research, such as more-thorough vetting of visa applications from international students and
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In recent years, the notion of an insect apocalypse has become a hot topic in the conservation science community and has captured the public’s attention. Scientists who warn that this catastrophe is unfolding assert that arthropods – a large category of invertebrates that includes insects—are rapidly declining, perhaps signaling a general collapse of ecosystems across the
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Eight months into the global pandemic, we’re still measuring its effects only in deaths. Non-hospitalized cases are loosely termed ‘mild’ and are not followed up. Recovery is implied by discharge from hospital or testing negative for the virus. Ill health in those classed as ‘recovered’ is going largely unmeasured. And, worldwide, millions of those still
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Melissa McKenzie colouring with her daughter.Credit: Melissa McKenzie For Prabha Devan, a stem-cell biologist at the Centre for Cellular and Molecular Biology (CCMB) in Hyderabad, India, transitioning to remote working during the coronavirus pandemic has been more than just an inconvenience. Not only must she try to finish her research from home but she must
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Derecho, a rare storm packed with 100mph winds and power like that of a hurricane, slammed across the Midwest on Monday. The storm toppled trees and powerlines, flipped vehicles, caused widespread damage of properties, and left thousands of homes without power. It continued to move towards Chicago, Indiana, and Michigan.  The National Weather Service Storm
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A recently published study revealed that fertilizers and pesticide application to cropland are now the primary sources of sulfur to the environment. Historically, the coal-fired power plants were the most significant contributor of reactive sulfur to the environment, but synthetic agricultural inputs now replace it. Acid rain, the form of precipitation that contains an increased
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The explosion on 4 August destroyed buildings across Beirut.Credit: Fadel Itani/NurPhoto/Getty On the evening of 4 August, Pierre Khoueiry was making birthday plans with his wife and two-year-old son when a blast shattered the windows of the family’s apartment in Beirut. About 2.5 kilometres away, in the city’s port, a powerful explosion had sent a
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Mauritius citizens and groups are trying to contain the recent oil spill and protect the coastline and Mahebourg Lagoon. Thousands of Mauritians, from residents and students to environmental activists, worked non-stop last Sunday to try to reduce the damage of the oil spill on an island in the Indian Ocean when a ship had an unfortunate encounter with a reef. Due
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The New Horizons mission shows that Pluto’s far-side contains a number of geological features that are puzzling scientists. Download MP3 In 2015, after a nine-and-a-half-year journey, NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft raced past Pluto, beaming images of the dwarf planet back to Earth. Five years after the mission, researchers are poring over images of Pluto’s far-side,
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MV Wakashio struck a coral reef in the Indian Ocean on July 25, and it has since begun leaking tons of fuel into the surrounding waters of Mauritius.  The incident prompted the Mauritius Prime Minister Pravind Jugnauth to announce a state of environmental agency on Friday. He also asked for help from France President Emmanuel Macron in handling
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A study showed that large carnivores are less inclined to attack cattle when they have painted eyes on their rumps. A significant challenge for conservation involves wild carnivores preying livestock, including the human retaliatory killing of these carnivores. Rural people in the southern hemisphere mostly bear these conflicts between humans and wildlife drive declines of large carnivores’ populations and the costs from
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A space-based sensor has detected new colonies of emperor penguins on Antarctic sea ice. Credit: Christopher Walton Ecology 07 August 2020 Images from space bolster the population count, but the birds remain vulnerable to climate change. From their vantage point high above Antarctica, sharp-eyed satellites have spotted eight previously unknown colonies of emperor penguins. The
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Controlling deforestation (shown here, in a tropical rainforest in the Congo Basin) could decrease the risk of future pandemics, experts say.Credit: Patrick Landmann/Science Photo Library As humans diminish biodiversity by cutting down forests and building more infrastructure, they’re increasing the risk of disease pandemics such as COVID-19. Many ecologists have long suspected this, but a
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A project of ‘before & after’ photographs of glaciers in Patagonia shows the dramatic impact of global warming in the past century. Images taken in the year 1913 were replicated with their present-day equivalent, exposing the damages wrought by climate change. The Photographers Cristian Donoso dedicated the past 24 years to show these effects. For his 2018 Postcards of Ice project, he collaborated with Alfredo Pourailly
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The Ecuadorian navy encountered nearly 260 fishing vessels with Chinese flags sailing on the coast of Galapagos Islands.  According to the Island’s Governor Norman Wray, the Chinese fleet is within international waters outside the maritime border around the Galapagos Islands and Ecuador’s coastal waters.  Every year, Chinese fishing vessels come to the seas near Galapagos. This
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These 3D-printed objects are luminous under ultraviolet light thanks to crystals of fluorescent dye. Credit: Amar Flood Materials science 06 August 2020 Crystals of physically distanced dye molecules fluoresce brilliantly in a rainbow of colours. Scientists have combined new fluorescent dyes with plastic to create some of the most brightly glowing objects ever made. Most
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Credit: Daniel Grizelj/Getty International collaborations account for almost one-quarter of all publications and produce notable citations and influence. But the coronavirus pandemic is likely to choke off much of this momentum: researchers can’t meet face-to-face when would-be travellers are cautioned against flying or are banned from certain destinations. The impact of COVID-19 threatens to derail
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Transmissible or zoonotic wildlife diseases increase as nature is damaged, due to the increase of bats and rats harboring pandemic pathogens such as the SARS-CoV-2. Human-induced destruction of ecosystems causes an increase in the populations of animals that carry diseases, which could cause pandemics. The Emergence of Transmissible Diseases Human societies are increasingly being infected by diseases that come from wildlife. These diseases include those caused
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1. Mills, K. et al. Fisheries management in a changing climate: lessons from the 2012 ocean heat wave in the Northwest Atlantic. Oceanography 26, 191–195 (2013). Google Scholar  2. Wernberg, T. et al. An extreme climatic event alters marine ecosystem structure in a global biodiversity hotspot. Nat. Clim. Chang. 3, 78–82 (2013). ADS  Google Scholar 
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Ecoplant, a leading provider of revolutionary industrial IoT solutions for compressed air systems partners with Atlas Machine & Supply Inc., a distributor and service provider of industrial air compressors to boost the compressed air system technology of U.S. factories. Eco plant aims to introduce revolutionary technologies to U.S. factories that rely on air compressors, making
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Humans have altered more than half of Earth’s habitable land to meet the needs of our burgeoning population1. The transformation of forests, grasslands and deserts into cities, suburbs and agricultural land has caused many species to decline or disappear, whereas others have thrived2. The losers tend to be ecological specialists, such as rhinoceros or ostriches,
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New observations show that seismometers can detect magnetic-field fluctuations linked to the Northern Lights (above, at Fairbanks, Alaska). Credit: Getty Geophysics 04 August 2020 Earthquake-monitoring stations could also help to monitor the effects of incoming solar particles. Seismometers in Alaska that normally measure trembling in the ground also pick up signals from the Northern Lights
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New research urgently calls for biological control and an integrated management strategy in fighting Mimosa diplotricha, an invasive weed that threatens southern and eastern African livelihoods. (Photo: Wikimedia Commons)New research urgently calls for biological control and an integrated management strategy in fighting Mimosa diplotricha, an invasive weed that threatens southern and eastern African livelihoods. Dr.
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Hiroshima survivor Setsuko Thurlow (pictured, centre, receiving the 2017 Nobel Peace Prize on behalf of the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons) has written to world leaders this week urging them to step up disarmament efforts.Credit: Lise Aserud/EPA-EFE/Shutterstock The start of August marks an inauspicious anniversary for science, that of the first — and, so
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 Panda is one of the most recognized symbols of conservation, as these endearing animals have been pulled out from the brink of extinction. However, studies reveal that protecting the giant panda left other predators in the habitat: leopards, snow leopards, wolves, and Asian wild dog populations showed a dramatic decline over the years.  (Photo : Pixabay)Panda is
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Japan is considering new rules to prevent the leak of sensitive technology, such as sensors.Credit: Tomohiro Ohsumi/Getty The Japanese government is considering tougher rules to address the risk of foreign interference in scientific research, such as more thorough vetting of visa applications from international students and researchers and requiring institutions to declare foreign sources of
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In 2011, the whale watching industry was estimated to be more than 2 billion dollars, as 13 million people went whale watching. With the advent of selfies and social media, whale watching fans are expected to increase at a much higher rate over the years.  Over the years, the industry has transformed sleeping coastal communities
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Klaus Fuchs was arrested for espionage in 1950.Credit: GL Archive/Alamy Atomic Spy: The Dark Lives of Klaus Fuchs Nancy Thorndike Greenspan Viking (2020) Klaus Fuchs is better remembered for his betrayal than for his science. The brilliant German theoretical physicist handed the Soviet Union secrets that allowed it to accelerate its cold-war work on a
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Air pollution contributes to as many as 9 million premature deaths worldwide each year – twice as many as war, other violence, HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria combined. Fine particulate matter air pollution is especially dangerous: Microscopic particles readily enter the lungs, bloodstream and brain, with health effects that include infant death, reduced life expectancy for adults,
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Credit: Getty A group of European funding agencies and research councils is calling for organizations to adopt new measures to evaluate researchers and grant proposals, expanding beyond conventional metrics such as publication records or previous grant success. The suggested measures include assessing a researcher’s output or grant proposal for its potential for economic and societal
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