Nature

As Earth formed from the disk of matter swirling around the Sun (artist’s impression), hydrogen moved into what would become the planet’s core. Credit: Gregoire Cirade/SPL Geology 25 May 2020 The core might contain Earth’s biggest reservoir as a result of hydrogen moving into the early planet’s centre. Earth’s core might contain most of the
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Einstein on Einstein Hanoch Gutfreund & Jürgen Renn Princeton Univ. Press (2020) Albert Einstein admitted in his final essay, ‘Autobiographical sketch’, that fellow physicists opposed his quest to unify the general theory of relativity with quantum mechanics. But he took comfort from philosopher Gotthold Lessing’s dictum: “The search for truth is more precious than its
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Hello Nature readers, would you like to get this Briefing in your inbox free every day? Sign up here Bumble bee (Bombus terrestris) worker damages a plant leaf. Bee-inflicted leaf damage leads to accelerated flowering and might have implications for the phenological synchrony of plants and pollinators.Hannier Pulido, De Moraes and Mescher Laboratories When pollen
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Authorities recently found a Catahoula mix on the side of a road in Texas, where the dog was seen guarding another dog’s body. The Kingsville-Kleberg Health Department Animal Control & Care Center reported that the dog, who they named ‘Guardian,’ was standing beside the dead body as though it was protecting it. When Animal Control Officers tried to approach the two,
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SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus particles imaged using an electron microscope.Credit: NIAID/National Institutes of Health/Science Photo Library Brazil’s researchers have a battle on their hands. The country has the world’s third-highest number of confirmed COVID-19 cases, with more than 300,000 infections and 20,000 deaths. Scientists there have to fight not only the coronavirus, but also the government’s anti-science
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A species of parchment tubeworm can exude slime that can glow a blue hue that lasts for days. Predators can get this sticky mucus with a blue glow on them if they tread upon these tubeworms. Such luminescence is produced by many algae, bacteria, and higher animals. However, the light they produce does not last very
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John Horton Conway was one of the most versatile mathematicians of the past century, who made influential contributions to group theory, analysis, topology, number theory, geometry, algebra and combinatorial game theory. His deep yet accessible work, larger-than-life personality, quirky sense of humour and ability to talk about mathematics with any and all who would listen
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Correction to: Nature https://doi.org/10.1038/s41586-020-2172-5Published online 22 April 2020 In the abstract of this Article, “consistent with the lack of precursory summit inflation” should have read “consistent with the lack of substantial precursory summit inflation”, because a small amount (2–3 cm) of localized summit inflation was detected with GPS starting about two weeks before the eruption.
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Despite the inconvenience and the economic impact that the international response has caused, there is a good side to it. The government lockdown around the world slashed the global carbon emissions by more than 8 percent, as two independent studies revealed.  Two international teams did different studies estimated how carbon emissions reduced across various sectors, each
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Measures aimed at slowing coronavirus spread are affecting other communicable diseases.Credit: Leon Neal/Getty Lockdowns and social-distancing measures aimed at slowing the spread of coronavirus seem to have shortened the influenza season in the northern hemisphere by about six weeks. Globally, an estimated 290,000–650,000 people typically die from seasonal flu, so a shorter flu season could
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Paint in this version of The Scream, held by the Munch Museum in Oslo, has degraded with time. Credit: Stian Lysberg Solum/AFP/Getty Materials science 21 May 2020 Storing Edvard Munch’s masterpiece at low humidity will help to preserve its colours, analysis shows. Bright yellow hues that once screamed from Edvard Munch’s iconic painting The Scream
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Evidence shows that women perform more household work than men do.Credit: Getty Quarantined with a six-year-old child underfoot, Megan Frederickson wondered how academics were managing to write papers during the COVID-19 pandemic. Lockdowns implemented to stem coronavirus spread meant that, overnight, many households worldwide had become an intersection of work, school and home life. Conversations
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The study conducted at the Australian National University has revealed the full extent of the Victorian bush fires raging for the past two decades. These wildfires have been significantly increasing both in size and frequency across Victoria. The research of Professor David Lindenmayer and Chris Taylor entitled: “New spatial analyses of Australian wildfire highlight the need
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Migrant workers living in dormitories in Singapore were initially overlooked for coronavirus testing.Credit: Edgar Su/Reuters Respiratory pathogens spread like wildfire when people are in close contact. So it’s little wonder that almost all of the 150 biggest coronavirus outbreaks in the United States have been in prisons, nursing homes, veterans’ homes, psychiatric hospitals, meat-packing plants
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Meetings can be accessed while working from home.Credit: Getty Lynn Cominsky, an astrophysicist at Sonoma State University in California, had planned to spend part of late March and early April in Johannesburg, South Africa, for the Ninth Fermi International Symposium, an event that would have gathered hundreds of astronomers and astrophysicists with an interest in
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A study regarding the method and economy of movement of giant predatory dinosaurs, including the Tyrannosaurus rex, has recently been published on May 13 in PLOS One, an open-access scientific journal. The paper is entitled: “The Fast and the Frugal: Divergent Locomotory Strategies Drive Limb Lengthening in Theropod Dinosaurs.” Mount Marty College conducted the study, South
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Credit: Adapted from Getty I was fortunate enough to go into the laboratory recently — on vaccine-related coronavirus research that we hope might inform studies about the minimum dose of vaccine that can be used. This research is very much a tiny cog in a huge global wheel. By the time I had aliquoted the
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John Houghton (right) at the opening of a weather centre in 1985.Credit: PA Archive/PA John Houghton was instrumental in founding and shaping the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). The climate scientist led the panel’s Scientific Assessment of Climate Change working group from its formation in 1988 until 2002. Under his guidance, the IPCC did
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Living microalgae to treat slow-healing wounds? This research says it is possible. Researchers at the Nanjing University in China were able to develop a wound patch filled with what we know as blue-green algae, starring their ability to naturally produce oxygen through photosynthesis. These microorganisms, scientifically called Synechococcus elongatus, are used in the study to speed
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Hello Nature readers, would you like to get this Briefing in your inbox free every day? Sign up here An 8,400-year-old skeleton from the Qihe cave archaeological site in Fujian, China.Credit: Xiujie Wu/Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology The first large ancient-genome studies of East Asia suggest that many of its inhabitants descend from two
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Benjamin Thompson, Noah Baker, and Amy Maxmen discuss the latest COVID-19 news. Download MP3 In this episode: 00:57 The epidemiology of misinformation As the pandemic spreads, so does a tidal wave of misinformation and conspiracy theories. We discuss how researchers’ are tracking the spread of questionable content, and ways to limit its impact. News: Anti-vaccine
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Garment workers in Bangladesh risk their lives in an industry devastated by the collapse in global spending.Credit: Zabed Hasnain Chowdhury/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty There has never been a harder time to be a political leader. The choices that must be made are enormous, the consequences potentially catastrophic, the science guiding those decisions uncertain — and
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