Nature

Significant amounts of Pesticide mixtures from rivers and creeks are being discharged to the Great Barrier Reef, a problem bigger than was previously thought by scientists. Researchers from the University of Queensland led a new study that conducted the very first analysis of pesticide mixture concentrations in these bodies of water on a wide scale.
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The UAE’s Mars Hope probe launches from Japan’s Tanegashima Space Center at 6:58 local time.Credit: MBRSC The United Arab Emirates’ Hope orbiter is now winging its way to Mars after launching successfully from the Tanegashima Space Center near Minamitane, Japan. The probe, built by the United Arab Emirates (UAE) together with US partners, is the
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 A video showed a bison charging a woman and a man with the woman tripping, falling seconds later, and was then seen playing dead. The report said that the incident happened at Nez Perce Creek in Yellowstone National Park and that the woman got away unscathed from the incident. No information yet if the victim
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A recent study by Charles Darwin University in collaboration with the Australian Museum and the Queensland University of Technology discovered that the sugar glider that was believed to be a single species are three genetically and morphologically distinct species. Sugar gliders are gliding possums that are endemic to Australia, New Guinea, and some parts of the Indonesian Islands.
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Harvard University’s campus has emptied during the coronavirus lockdowns. The university was among the first to file a lawsuit that challenged an immigration rule targeting international students taking all their classes online.Credit: Maddie Meyer/Getty The US government has backed down from a policy to revoke the visas of international students who will attend only online
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The threat of deportation has been lifted from international students in the United States, thanks to fast and firm action from universities.Credit: Craig F. Walker/The Boston Globe/Getty Over the past week, more than 200 universities in the United States have shown the power of swift, mass mobilization. US states and technology companies were among those
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Ancient communities in Patagonia were the subject of a new study that shows how an ancient population of humans effectively adapted to climate change, which can offer useful insights for today’s environmental challenges. The study examined fishing patterns of prehistoric Patagonian hunter-gatherers, located in South America’s southern tip. The archaeologists used the remains of fish
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The artificial island of Northstar, an oil- and gas-production facility off the coast of Alaska, has suffered damage from high waves in the past, and would be vulnerable to the even-higher waves climate change is predicted to bring. Credit: Alamy Ocean sciences 17 July 2020 Waves crashing into Arctic coastlines could grow by as much
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The 30 rare shore plovers or tuturautu relocated to Mana Island off the coast of Porirua New Zealand vanished, leaving ornithologists baffled and concerned. These shore plovers are considered critically threatened in New Zealand, with only about 250 left. The majority of the population is in the Chatham Islands.  The shore plovers were relocated to Mana Island
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Scientific storytelling works best when it is succinct and jargon-free, Pakinam Amer discovers. Download MP3 In the final episode of this six-part series about science communication, three experts describe how they learned to craft stories about research for newspaper, magazine and book readers. David Kaiser, a physicist and science historian at Massachusetts Institute of Technology
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A CRISPR–Cas complex (purple and orange) edits a strand of DNA (green). An ultrasmall version of the Cas enzyme that cuts the DNA could make editing easier. Credit: Getty CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing 16 July 2020 The viruses called Biggiephages harbour compact enzymes that can target a broad range of DNA sequences. Unusually small enzymes from
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Perfectionism can often be more of a hindrance than a help, especially in the midst of a pandemic.Credit: David Malan/Getty Perfectionism tends to be painted as a positive trait: “It drives me”, “it helps me to maintain a high standard”, “I wouldn’t be here without it”, are the most common arguments I hear in my
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Catch up on all the latest from the world of science, brought to you by Shamini Bundell and Nick Howe. Download MP3 In this episode: 01:15 Magic angle graphene If you sandwich two sheets of graphene together and twist one in just the right way, it can gain some superconducting properties. Now, physicists have added
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Researchers found that Native Americans sustainably harvested and managed oyster reefs. Once, oysters were plentiful in the east coast estuaries of North America. Since the arrival of the Europeans, however, pollution, disease, and overharvesting have devastated the populations of this keystone species. Out of all eastern oyster reefs present in Georgia since the year 1889,
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Some 28,000 people travelled to the American Geophysical Union’s 2019 Fall Meeting, resulting in 80,000 tonnes of carbon emissions.Credit: AGU Before the pandemic, many academics were frequent flyers. We travelled to conferences and board meetings, to conduct fieldwork, to visit collaborators and to give seminars and lectures. Many of us took multiple long-haul flights per
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Livestock farming is one factor driving a rise in methane emissions.Credit: Lou Benoist/AFP/Getty Global methane emissions have risen nearly 10% over the past two decades, resulting in record-high atmospheric concentrations of the powerful greenhouse gas. In 2017, the latest year for which comprehensive data are available, global yearly emissions of the gas reached a record
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These authors contributed equally: X. Wu, M. Delbianco Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Stuttgart, Germany X. Wu, K. Anggara, T. Michnowicz, S. Sen, M. Pristl, S. Rauschenbach, U. Schlickum, S. Abb & K. Kern Max Planck Institute for Colloids and Interfaces, Potsdam, Germany M. Delbianco, A. Pardo-Vargas, P. Bharate & P. H. Seeberger Department of Chemistry, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK S. Rauschenbach Institute of Applied
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The great bath at Mohenjo-daro, a city of the Indus civilization built around 2500 bc in what is now Pakistan.Credit: DeAgostini/Getty The Life and Death of Ancient Cities: A Natural History Greg Woolf Oxford Univ. Press (2020) For millennia, cities have generated power, wealth, creativity, knowledge and magnificent buildings. They have also incubated hunger, violence,
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In-person conferences are cash cows for many scholarly societies.Credit: AGU When the American Association of Physical Anthropologists (AAPA) called off its annual meeting in March because of the coronavirus pandemic, it faced a potentially devastating financial blow. The costs associated with the decision, which included venue-cancellation penalties, registration reimbursements and meeting-planning expenses, looked as if
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Barbara Domayne-Hayman says scientific entrepreneurs should think in terms of knockbacks, not failure.Credit: Francis Crick Institute A successful entrepreneur has to pull things together and influence people. They need to be able to raise money, be good at presenting ideas and building trust, and know how to lead and inspire a team. In my part-time
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Kazakhs may have been accompanied by cats similar to the domestic cats common today. They served as pets to pastoralists more than 1,000 years ago. New international research analyses have determined this after an almost-complete cat skeleton was recovered during an excavation in Southern Kazakhstan along the former Silk Road. Researchers from Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU), the University of Tubingen and
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New research published last April in the journal Crop Science conducted by scientists from the Texas Tech University looked into the possibility of producing forage pearl millet and foraged sorghum as alternative forage crops to corn for feeding Texas livestock, as the Ogallala Aquifer declines. The study investigated the effects of deficient irrigation on the forage
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Hello Nature readers, would you like to get this Briefing in your inbox free every day? Sign up here Volunteers in Barcelona, Spain, prepare food packages for vulnerable people.Credit: Xinhua News Agency/Shutterstock Last month, Spain launched a website offering monthly payments of up to €1,015 (US$1,145) to its citizens to spend however they choose. Economists
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