Nature

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Scientists rediscover an elephant shrew species in Africa half a century after being “lost.” These obscure and cryptic mammalian species are mouse-sized, although it is a relative of the enormous elephant. A Lost Mammal This “lost” species was last recorded by science during the 1970s. The rediscovery occurred in the nation of Djibouti, which is located in the Horn of Africa, by a
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Black newborns’ odds of survival rise if the doctors who care for them are also Black. Credit: Getty Society 19 August 2020 Hospital records show a link between the doctor’s ethnicity and the risk of death for Black newborns. When caring for Black babies, Black doctors outperform their white colleagues at making sure the infants
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New research debunked the speculation that migration mortality has caused the significant decline of the butterfly monarch population, despite it having received much attention. The study was published in the journal Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution on August 7.  The monarch butterfly has been declining the past twenty years, according to Monarch Watch Director Chip Taylor.
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US graduate students are experiencing higher levels of mental-health distress amid the COVID-19 pandemic.Credit: Jonathan Knowles/Getty Signs of depression among graduate students in the United States have apparently doubled during the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a survey that drew responses from more than 15,000 graduate and 30,000 undergraduate students at 9 US research universities. The
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Many schools worldwide have introduced measures to keep students apart at school.Credit: Lauren DeCicca/Getty At schools across South Korea, children eat their lunches in silence, facing plastic screens that separate them from their friends1. They wear masks, except when practising social distancing in the playground. And their temperatures are checked twice every morning — first
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A new study of a site in Border Cave, South Africa, found that our human ancestors made human beddings and led complex lives. Their beddings show their ingenuity, cleverness, and intelligence. (Photo : Wikimedia Commons)Early Later Stone Age layers at Border Cave (Wikimedia Commons).A new study of a site in Border Cave, South Africa found that our human ancestors made
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A dysregulated immune response, a cytokine storm and cytokine-release syndrome1,2 are some of the terms used to describe the overexuberant defence response that is thought to contribute to disease severity in certain people who become seriously ill with COVID-19. However, a precise definition of this type of immune dysfunction remains elusive. Writing in Nature, Lucas
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Maasai teacher Isaac Mkalia consults his mobile phone in Kenya.Credit: Sven Torfinn/Panos Your call to scale back the ambitions of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs; see Nature 583, 331–332; 2020) conflates two issues. The first is whether the goals are technically and financially feasible. The second is whether they are likely to be accomplished under
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A recent study has found that 10,000 die each day from fossil fuel air pollutants and that climate change is not the only significant consequence of fossil fuel burning but also air pollution. The research was published in the Cardiovascular Research journal. The Benefits of Fossil Fuels Fossil fuels are burned to produce power, run vehicles, and operate industry. They are also consumed for heat
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The warming ocean waters are irreversibly losing the ice in Greenland. Satellite data gathered for almost four decades have shown that the glaciers on Greenland have been shrinking to the point that even if climate change stopped right now, its ice sheet would continue to shrink. Troubling Study This is the result of a study published in Nature Communications Earth and Environment journal. It shows that
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Ottoline Leyser took over as chief of UKRI in June.Credit: Mike Thornton Ottoline Leyser is optimistic about taking on the most powerful job in UK science. In June, the plant scientist became the second director of Britain’s behemoth research-funding agency, UK Research and Innovation (UKRI). The agency brought together nine different funders when it was
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Princeton University announced in June that it would rename its public-policy programme, to remove association with Woodrow Wilson. As president of the university in the early twentieth century. Wilson discouraged the enrolment of Black students.Credit: Dominick Reuter/Reuters Nearly five years ago, the Black Justice League student group at Princeton University in New Jersey organized a
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Researchers have recently discovered a new method to extract rare earth elements, or REE, from the drainage of acid mines through CO2 mineralization. Penn State University researchers published their discovery in a paper in the online Chemical Engineering Journal. Rare Earth Elements REEs or Rare earth elements are a mineral group composed of seventeen minerals, which are useful for making advanced technological devices like electric vehicle batteries. Rare
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A grid of speakers (grey and black, far left) emitted sound waves to ‘write’ numbers inside an echo-free chamber. Credit: Bakhtiyar Orazbayev Applied physics 14 August 2020 A composite material helps scientists to see the details in ‘acoustic images’ depicting numbers. Scientists who used a set of speakers to ‘draw’ an image with sound have
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Running a brewing business combines scientific techniques with soft skills honed during a PhD.Credit: Michael Short/Bloomberg/Getty Many scientists start hobbies to take their minds off research and to connect with people outside academia. Some make these pastimes their careers. Nature spoke to four researchers who turned their brewing and fermentation hobbies into business ventures. The
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A new study found a frog in Brazil’s rainforests to be the first species of amphibian known to exhibit polygyny, having a harem of one male with two loyal female mates. Polygyny is considered the most common system of mating in animals. It has been observed in reptiles, bony fishes, birds, invertebrates, and mammals. Before, it is not exhibited by amphibians. (Photo :
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Sad reflections: impostor syndrome can distort your self-image and leave you drained and demoralized.Credit: Getty During my career as a laboratory manager and mentor, I’ve known plenty of researchers who’ve been quick to devalue their accomplishments, or to worry that a supervisor’s congratulations were prompted more by kindness than by genuine admiration. Often, those same
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A way to help curb deforestation and environmental damage in the Amazon rainforest and consequently slow down climate change is to provide indigenous communities in Brazil full indigenous property rights to their tribal lands. New research from UCSD scientists have been published online in the PNAS journal. (Photo : Getty Images)Yanomami indigenous look on as
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a, Neurons from the TG were tested for heat and agonist sensitivity. Left, percentage distributions of heat-sensitive and agonist-sensitive neurons. TRPA1 is strongly co-expressed with TRPV1 or TRPM3 (39%), with few neurons expressing TRPA1 alone (2.5%). Heat-sensitive neurons that respond to heat but do not express any of TRPV1, TRPM3 or TRPA1 can be clearly
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1. Cochrane, P. T., Milburn, G. J. & Munro, W. J. Macroscopically distinct quantum-superposition states as a bosonic code for amplitude damping. Phys. Rev. A 59, 2631–2634 (1999). ADS  CAS  Article  Google Scholar  2. Mirrahimi, M. et al. Dynamically protected cat-qubits: a new paradigm for universal quantum computation. New J. Phys. 16, 045014 (2014). ADS 
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The Environmental Protection Agency will lift the policy that controls the release of methane, a gas emitted from leaks and flares in oil and gas well. The recent development is among the current controversial environmental policies that were reversed or relaxed lately. Here are some of the recent controversial environmental policies that had caused alarm among environmental advocates.  Lifting
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Japan is considering new rules to prevent the leak of sensitive technology, such as sensors.Credit: Tomohiro Ohsumi/Getty Japan considers new rules on research interference amid US–China tensions The Japanese government is considering tougher rules to address the risk of foreign interference in scientific research, such as more-thorough vetting of visa applications from international students and
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In recent years, the notion of an insect apocalypse has become a hot topic in the conservation science community and has captured the public’s attention. Scientists who warn that this catastrophe is unfolding assert that arthropods – a large category of invertebrates that includes insects—are rapidly declining, perhaps signaling a general collapse of ecosystems across the
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Eight months into the global pandemic, we’re still measuring its effects only in deaths. Non-hospitalized cases are loosely termed ‘mild’ and are not followed up. Recovery is implied by discharge from hospital or testing negative for the virus. Ill health in those classed as ‘recovered’ is going largely unmeasured. And, worldwide, millions of those still
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Melissa McKenzie colouring with her daughter.Credit: Melissa McKenzie For Prabha Devan, a stem-cell biologist at the Centre for Cellular and Molecular Biology (CCMB) in Hyderabad, India, transitioning to remote working during the coronavirus pandemic has been more than just an inconvenience. Not only must she try to finish her research from home but she must
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Derecho, a rare storm packed with 100mph winds and power like that of a hurricane, slammed across the Midwest on Monday. The storm toppled trees and powerlines, flipped vehicles, caused widespread damage of properties, and left thousands of homes without power. It continued to move towards Chicago, Indiana, and Michigan.  The National Weather Service Storm
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A recently published study revealed that fertilizers and pesticide application to cropland are now the primary sources of sulfur to the environment. Historically, the coal-fired power plants were the most significant contributor of reactive sulfur to the environment, but synthetic agricultural inputs now replace it. Acid rain, the form of precipitation that contains an increased
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The explosion on 4 August destroyed buildings across Beirut.Credit: Fadel Itani/NurPhoto/Getty On the evening of 4 August, Pierre Khoueiry was making birthday plans with his wife and two-year-old son when a blast shattered the windows of the family’s apartment in Beirut. About 2.5 kilometres away, in the city’s port, a powerful explosion had sent a
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Mauritius citizens and groups are trying to contain the recent oil spill and protect the coastline and Mahebourg Lagoon. Thousands of Mauritians, from residents and students to environmental activists, worked non-stop last Sunday to try to reduce the damage of the oil spill on an island in the Indian Ocean when a ship had an unfortunate encounter with a reef. Due
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The New Horizons mission shows that Pluto’s far-side contains a number of geological features that are puzzling scientists. Download MP3 In 2015, after a nine-and-a-half-year journey, NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft raced past Pluto, beaming images of the dwarf planet back to Earth. Five years after the mission, researchers are poring over images of Pluto’s far-side,
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MV Wakashio struck a coral reef in the Indian Ocean on July 25, and it has since begun leaking tons of fuel into the surrounding waters of Mauritius.  The incident prompted the Mauritius Prime Minister Pravind Jugnauth to announce a state of environmental agency on Friday. He also asked for help from France President Emmanuel Macron in handling