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By Natalia A. Ramos Miranda People watch the solar eclipse near ESO Observatory at Coquimbo, Chile July 2, 2019. REUTERS/Rodrigo Garrido CACHIYUYO, Chile (Reuters) – In the minutes before a solar eclipse plunged Chile into darkness, a loudspeaker projected a deep baritone to a group of blind men and women who had traveled to the
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All of the stars Matthew Knight saw through the giant telescope in Arizona were bright with persistent light. All of them but one, which appeared to be flashing, in a way – light that went in and out, dull and then bright, every hour. He assumed that there was something wrong with his data. But
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A solar eclipse is observed at Coquimbo, Chile, July 2, 2019. REUTERS/Rodrigo Garrido SANTIAGO (Reuters) – Hundreds of thousands of tourists scattered across the north Chilean desert on Tuesday to experience a rare, and irresistible combination for astronomy buffs: a total eclipse of the sun viewed from beneath the world’s clearest skies. A solar eclipse
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In the United States, Opportunity Zones (OZs) have provided developers with new possibilities. The race is now on to determine whether renewable energy developers can catch up to their real estate counterparts in utilizing this new tool. Opportunity Zones are defined as: “economically-distressed communities where new investments, under certain conditions, may be eligible for preferential
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Last week, the FT reported that a group of Britain’s best-known quantum computing scientists had moved quietly to Silicon Valley to found a startup called PsiQ. The lure was the abundance of venture capital that can’t be had in Europe. The American VC firm Playground, set up by Android’s founder Andy Rubin, has invested in
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Black holes are renowned for absorbing matter and having an event horizon from which nothing can escape,and for cannibalizing its neighbors. But this does not imply that black holes will consume the Universe. There are other processes at play as well, and if they dominate, they can lead to a vastly different fate for most
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WASHINGTON (Reuters) – After investigating the nature of a mysterious and apparently cigar-shaped object called ‘Oumuamua spotted in 2017 speeding through our solar system, astronomers remain uncertain over how to classify it, but are confident it is not an alien spaceship. This artist’s impression shows the first-known interstellar object to visit the solar system, ‘Oumuamua,
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Do not swim with diarrhea. (Photo: Getty Images) Getty When someone offers you the opportunity to swim in “crypto,” make sure you find out specifically what is meant by “crypto.” Swimming in cryptocurrency could be good. Swimming in Cryptosporidium would not be good. From 2009 to 2017, apparently both types of “crypto” have been on the
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The rocket was named “Make It Rain”. Rocket Lab Rocket Lab has successfully launched a rideshare mission for the private aerospace company Spaceflight, as they look to continue racking up their launch cadence in 2019. The U.S.-based company’s two-stage electron rocket lifted off from their Launch Complex 1 on the Mahia Peninsula in New Zealand at 12.30
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Share to facebook Share to twitter Share to linkedin The sea slug, Elysia rufescens, at the French island territory, La Réunion. Philippe Bourjon | Wikimedia Commons “Sacoglossans” are a family of “sap-sucking” sea slugs known for slurping up the innards of different kinds of algae. Consisting of nearly 300 unique species, Sacoglossans do not all
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The vegan trend has quadrupled in the five years between 2012 and 2017.  It now gets almost 3 times more interest than vegetarian and gluten-free searches in Google. If the world went vegan, it could save 8 million human lives by 2050, reduce greenhouse gas emissions by two thirds and lead to healthcare-related savings and
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GANZHOU, May 20, 2019 — Chinese President Xi Jinping, also general secretary of the Communist Party of China Central Committee and chairman of the Central Military Commission, learns about the production process and operation of the JL MAG Xinhua News Agency/Getty Images President Trump has picked a fight with China on trade. This has run
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Share to facebook Share to twitter Share to linkedin Cawthron Institute scientist Mike Packer in algal growth room. Cawthron Institute A team at the Nelson Artificial Intelligence Institute has developed technology they claim can detect tiny algal cells in the ocean before they multiply to create toxic algal blooms. Toxic algal blooms, also know as ‘red tides’, are
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Humpback whales feed on fish—and microplastics—in Alaska. Getty Microplastics are found everywhere, from remote wilderness to the depths of the sea. They can alter growth of our agricultural crops. Recently, researchers Gloria Fackelmann and Dr. Simone Sommer of Ulm University conducted an extensive review covering how ingested microplastic causes an imbalance in the gut microbiomes of animals
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I spend a lot of time pointing out that weather and climate are different. I often use the analogy that “weather is your mood, and climate is your personality.” Scientists (and scientifically-literate people) are usually stunned by comments framing day-to-day weather variability as some type of litmus test for the validity of anthropogenic climate change.
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Just as SpaceX CEO Elon Musk prepared for the “most difficult launch” of his rocket company with Falcon Heavy rocket, the space-enthusiast changed his display picture on Twitter from an alcoholic monkey to that of an astronaut sipping hot coffee on Mars. The picture uploaded on Monday shows an astronaut, leaning against what looks like
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What makes marathoners like Jennifer Brill different? Sure, they have to have guts to finish such grueling races. But what are in those guts? (Photo by Donald Miralle/Getty Images for Rock’n’Roll Marathon) Getty When a bacteria gives you the runs, this usually means that it causes really bad diarrhea. Such a situation may also prompt
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Why would electric bacteria exist in the first place? The vast majority of organisms use oxygen to metabolize energy because oxygen accepts electrons well. In low-oxygen environments, this isn’t an option. Bacteria living in these oxygen-limited environments replace oxygen with iron. And instead of the metabolic reactions occurring within cells, the bacteria actually move electrons into
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A Navy blue CDS, which also comes in cinnamon brown, rose red and jet black. Mi Terro Plastic in the ocean needs to hit the road, take a trip, get out of town. A group of students at the University of Southern California Marshall School of Business have created a travel bag made of cork and recycled
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Parts of Colorado received almost 2 feet of snow at the beginning of summer. It’s not that I am psychic or anything, but I bet someone on Twitter used that to dismiss climate change. Such a scientifically illiterate statement is why science communication is so important. This past week meteorologists from around the world participated in a
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Microsoft’s education arm and NASA have come together to create online lessons to get school students interested about space. The eight online lesson plans range from titles such as Designing Astro Socks to protect astronauts’ feet in microgravity to designing one’s own space station, CNET reported on Friday.  The curriculum includes 3D design challenges, Virtual
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Share to facebook Share to twitter Share to linkedin Boaty McBoatface Povl Abrahamsen, British Antarctic Survey Boaty McBoatface, an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) used for polar science research, made an important discovery while deployed in the Southern Ocean in April 2017. Over the course of three days, the AUV traveled over 100 miles across underwater valleys to measure seawater temperature,
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From left: Universidad de Los Andes winners of Biodesign Challenge Laura Calderón, Paola Camacho, Isabel Pulido and Juan Angulo Photo Valery Rizzo Over two days the halls of Parsons School of Design and the Museum of Modern Art teemed with groups of college students rehearsing presentations and discussing projects they had spent months perfecting for
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MUMBAI (Reuters) – From companies building palm-sized satellites to those aiming to propel satellites into space using cleaner fuels, a new wave of space technology startups are mushrooming in India, catching the attention of investors keen to join the space race. Bellatrix Aerospace CEO Rohan Ganapathy stands next to a vacuum chamber at their laboratory
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