AWS launches Amazon Honeycode, a no-code mobile and web app builder

Tech

AWS today announced the beta launch of Amazon Honeycode, a new fully managed low-code/no-code development tool that aims to make it easy for anybody in a company to build their own applications. All of this, of course, is backed by a database in AWS and a web-based drag-and-drop interface builder.

Developers can build applications for up to 20 users for free. After that, the pay per user and for the storage their applications take up.

Image Credits: Amazon/AWS

Like similar tools, Honeycode provides users with a set of templates for commonly use cases like to-do list applications, customer trackers, surveys, schedules and inventory management. Traditionally, AWS argues, a lot of businesses have relied on shared spreadsheets to do these things.

“Customers try to solve for the static nature of spreadsheets by emailing them back and forth, but all of the emailing just compounds the inefficiency because email is slow, doesn’t scale, and introduces versioning and data syncing errors,” the company notes in today’s announcement. “As a result, people often prefer having custom applications built, but the demand for custom programming often outstrips developer capacity, creating a situation where teams either need to wait for developers to free up or have to hire expensive consultants to build applications.”

It’s no surprise then that Honeycode uses a spreadsheet view as its core data interface, which makes sense, given how familiar virtually every potential user is with this concept. AWS says these databases can easily scale up to 100,000 rows per workbook. With this, AWS argues, users can then focus on building their applications without having to worry about the underlying infrastructure.

Honeycode currently only runs in the AWS US West region in Oregon but is coming to other regions soon.

Among its first customers are SmugMug and Slack.

Updating…

Products You May Like

Articles You May Like

Three companies selected to develop military GPS handheld devices
Just in time for severe weather: Radio occultation data feeds NOAA weather models
Extreme Heat and Rain: Thousands of Weather Stations Show There’s Now More of Both, for Longer
A recapitalization reckoning
Op-ed | Is the future of space ops officeless?

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *